Chiropractic Coaching: Practice Rescue, Volume 7: A Better Office Visit

Chiropractic Coaching: Practice Rescue, Volume 7: A Better Office Visit

*The following is an actual transcript for Chiropractic Coaching: Practice Rescue, Volume 7: A Better Office Visit. We do our best to make sure the transcript is as accurate as possible, however, it may contain spelling or grammatical errors.*

Chiropractic Coaching: Practice Rescue, Volume 7: A Better Office Visit

Hello everybody. And welcome to Thrive in Five. I’m Dr. Dennis Perman, and I’ll be your chiropractic coach for this session today. We’re gonna be talking about a better office visit now, as you well know, years are made of months and months are made of weeks and weeks are made of days and days are made of hours, but hours are made of visits. And if you use an effective unit of time for your office visit, it sets the stage for your most successful hour, day, week, month, and year. So we’re gonna boil this down to what it takes to create an ideal office visit so that each visit that you perform is going to be as close to as efficient, as thorough as clinically. Excellent. And as compassionate as you can possibly make it. So let’s begin a visit is a creative event. A creative event means that it starts someplace.
It goes someplace and it ends someplace. It has a beginning, a middle and a closing. So all creative efforts, follow this pattern. A movie has a beginning, a middle and an end, a poem, a class, a song. They all have a beginning, a middle and an end and your office visit should also have a beginning, a middle and an end. Now the beginning is basically a greeting. Now you can just say, hi, how you doing? I mean, there’s nothing wrong with that. I like to break people’s pattern a little bit on the way into my office, because I don’t want them dredging forward that they fought with traffic, that they had a hard day at work that they’re going home to do, um, uh, to cook dinner or whatever. I wanna make sure that for the moments that I have them they’re completely and utterly with me.
So I would start an office visit with something like, Hey, is life exciting enough for you? Now? This doesn’t really mean anything, but what it does is it breaks the person’s pattern. They go, oh, is life exciting? I don’t know. Maybe it is. Maybe it isn’t, but at least it gets them out of whatever they were reading in the reception area or whatever. They were mulling over in their minds about their day’s work. Now I have them fully present. Now I need a connector in this beginning to get me into the middle of the visit, which is the adjustment. So I would typically say, is there anything I need to know about now, this is a lot different from how are you feeling? How are you feeling invites the patient to download all their symptoms on you while they were just in yesterday? You know what their symptoms are.
So it doesn’t make any sense to reinforce that, to take them back to that place. So that all they’re thinking about is their symptom. That makes no sense. So instead you ask, is there anything I need to know about with a little bit of emphasis on the word need? Now they think for a second, they say, well, I slept last night and I haven’t for a while and you say great. Or they say, wow, I fell down the stairs. I don’t know if I really messed myself up. I’m feeling kind of, kind of stiff. And you say, oh, okay. See, the idea is not for you to receive the information it’s for you to use the information, to get them onto the table as quickly as possible. So they say, I’m feeling better. You say, great, let’s check it. And you gesture toward the table so that they go immediately to the table.
Or if they say, yeah, I fell down the stairs. I think I heard myself. You say, okay, let’s check it. And you take your gesture and you gesture then to the adjusting table. And in 10 to 15 seconds, they’re on the adjusting table. Now I know that in some office procedures, the patient is already on the table, face down when the doctor comes in, that’s fine, but still there should be some engagement. So often doctors knee by the side of the table. And the patient turns the head toward the PA toward the doctor. And the doctor asks the question, Hey, is there anything I need to know about? They say, no, not really. And you say, okay, let’s check it. And that’s it. Now you’re into the visit. Now you do your magical office visit. And at the end of the visit, you bring the person up and you want to close the loop with a, with a similar question.
Is there anything else I need to know about now? Why is this so important? You see, if you study communications hypnosis, neurolinguistic programming, you realize that the best way for you to teach somebody something is to make sure that it goes directly into their subconscious. Now, when you create a loop where you ask a question and then you do something, and then you close the loop, then what happened in between goes into their subconscious and therefore all the good patient education you did when they were on the table and the feelings of relief and of comfort that they felt when you were adjusting them, that all becomes part of them. So there’s a method to this better office visit idea. The key here is for, to use the best and most masterful leadership and communication skills to be able to create the most extraordinary experience for your patient. Try this on, see how it works. I think you’ll be very happy with it. This is Dr. Dennis Perman for The Masters Circle Global, signing off a
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